Ford Reveals First PHEV Designed For Police & Government Organizations −


Electric Car Benefits

Published on November 22nd, 2017 | by James Ayre

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Ford Reveals First PHEV Designed For Police & Government Organizations

Following the reveal earlier this year of the first pursuit-rated hybrid police vehicle in the world, Ford has now also revealed a new plug-in hybrid offering designed for police forces and other government customers.

While the new plug-in hybrid (PHEV) only possesses an all-electric range of 21 miles per full-charge (that’s the essentially real-world range-rating to be provided by the US EPA), the model still represents an important milestone and will no doubt help users reduce their greenhouse gas emissions.

The Ford Special Service Plug-In Hybrid Sedan, as it’s been dubbed, was designed to meet the needs of those working in the sector that don’t need a pursuit-rated car — that is to say, detectives, police and fire chiefs, and other government personnel, working the slower aspects of the maintenance of the law.

“Technically speaking, the new Ford will have a modest 7.6 kWh lithium-ion battery pack for up to 21 miles of range on electric mode. Sound familiar? The Energi lineup from the company offers the same specs. That’s because this is a modified Ford Fusion Energi. The speed limit on electric mode is 85 mph and Ford estimates the total range is north of 500 miles in full hybrid mode,” Nicolas Zart of CleanTechnica writes.

“It also includes a 3.3 kW onboard charger, giving it 2.5 hours to fully charge on a 240-volt, Level 2 charger.”

There are several special features of the car for police use.

As you would imagine, the interior had to be customized, with heavy-duty cloth front seats and reduced bolsters for officer comfort. If you wonder what that means, I highly encourage you to go on a police day-long training where you walk around with the belts they carry. You will understand why they walk the way they do. Those belts are big and cumbersome. Arms simply don’t hang down. They bow over the belts and utensils. As far as the rear seats, the cars receive security anti-stab plates, vinyl rear seating with handcuffs holes for comfort, and special flooring. Why all that? Imagine cleaning cloth seats after taking intoxicated people to the station and you get the idea.

The Special Service PHEV Sedan had to reinforce its top tray for the usual police-mounted equipment, with a metal console mounting plate, red and white task lighting in the overhead console, a police engine-idle feature, unique alloy wheels, and an auxiliary power distribution box in the trunk.

It also comes with options, such as a driver spot lamp, a trunk storage vault, a trunk ventilation system, and a rear door control-disabling feature. There is also a special dark-car feature that dims the interior lighting dash cluster 100% for surveillance purposes, as well as several emergency lighting packages.

“Other highlights include a reinforced top tray for mounting equipment, metal console mounting plate, red and white task lighting in the overhead console, police engine-idle feature, unique alloy wheels and an auxiliary power distribution box in the trunk.”

Ordering for the new Ford Special Service Plug-In Hybrid Sedan begins in December, with sales/deliveries expected to begin sometime next summer, reportedly.

As noted above, this news follows on the unveiling of the Ford Police Responder Hybrid Sedan earlier this year. For more on that, see: Ford Reveals 1st Pursuit-Rated Hybrid Police Car.

For more context on both and EV use by police forces, also see: Ford Unveils New PHEV For Police & Government Fleets.


 

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About the Author

‘s background is predominantly in geopolitics and history, but he has an obsessive interest in pretty much everything. After an early life spent in the Imperial Free City of Dortmund, James followed the river Ruhr to Cofbuokheim, where he attended the University of Astnide. And where he also briefly considered entering the coal mining business. He currently writes for a living, on a broad variety of subjects, ranging from science, to politics, to military history, to renewable energy. You can follow his work on Google+.



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