Fiat Chrysler Automobiles Recalling More Than 16,000 Fiat 500e EVs Because Of Software Glitch −

Fiat Chrysler Automobiles Recalling More Than 16,000 Fiat 500e EVs Because Of Software Glitch

One of the less-obvious ways that Tesla has been shaking up the auto industry with its iconoclastic ideas has been its move towards over-the-air/wireless software updates as a way of dealing with some problems — rather than having to issue a recall anytime there’s a major software issue uncovered, the company can simply and quickly push out a patch wirelessly, as a tech company would.

With that in mind, news recently broke that Fiat Chrysler Automobiles (FCA) has issued a recall for more than 16,000 Fiat 500e electric vehicles (EVs) — model years 2013 through 2016 are affected — in order to deal with a software problem.

Fiat 500e grey 3 enhanced

The software glitch in question can apparently cause the car’s control systems to shut off vehicle propulsion in some situations — potentially leading to crashes or accidents.

It’s important to note here, though, that no injuries or deaths relating to this problem have been reported — so it mostly appears that the company is simply being responsible and proactive about the problem.

FCA discovered the software glitch during a “routine component check,” reportedly, rather than from customer complaints.

It should be remembered here that the Fiat 500e is essentially just a compliance car, and is currently only sold in California and Oregon. The company seemingly has no interest to release the model in other markets. All 16,549 of the Fiat 500e electric cars built between March 22, 2012, and January 29, 2016, are affected by the recall.

More information on the recall can be found online here, or by phone through the FCA customer service number (1-800-853-1403).

Photo by Kyle Field, for EVObsession.com | CleanTechnica.com | CleanTechnica.pics


 

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's background is predominantly in geopolitics and history, but he has an obsessive interest in pretty much everything. After an early life spent in the Imperial Free City of Dortmund, James followed the river Ruhr to Cofbuokheim, where he attended the University of Astnide. And where he also briefly considered entering the coal mining business. He currently writes for a living, on a broad variety of subjects, ranging from science, to politics, to military history, to renewable energy. You can follow his work on Google+.