A Service Check For A Nissan LEAF −

A Service Check For A Nissan LEAF

Published on February 10th, 2017 | by

February 10th, 2017 by

 Originally published on CleanTechnica.

I recently arrived at a Nissan dealer to get my service check for the Nissan LEAF. What’s involved with the all-electric Nissan LEAF servicing (approximately 1 year and 3 months after getting the car)?

I assumed one thing— checking the battery. It was good, all fine.

The air filter for the cabin was also replaced and the tires rotated. The service receptionist asked me how I like the LEAF.

Me: “I love it. I would never want to go back to a gas car after this EV experience.”

Service receptionist at Nissan: “You must live close to your work.” I took that to mean that to drive this all-electric vehicle, the case must be that I can only drive short distances — surely, I only drove a little bit.

“No,” I said, “Unfortunately, I do not. I have driven to Naples in the past for work. I drive to St. Petersburg for work, no problem. It is not so close. It is never a problem. I think many people are misinformed about what is involved with range issues and charging.”

A mechanic comes out and hears us and says, to reinforce her idea, “We need more infrastructure.”

I don’t get into a conversation with him as he is busy and walks on quickly. I want to say, “Hey, Sarasota and St. Petersburg are the two best cities in the state. I happen to live in spots with great EV infrastructure. So, if nowhere else in Florida, this dealership should be encouraging the sale of Nissan LEAFs.”

6 charging spots at UTC in Sarasota

Why don’t some of the local Nissan people know this? Or is it just change? Or common talking points that get repeated and repeated and repeated (maybe for several years at this point)?

To some of us, change is a freedom we are happy to enjoy. Promoting freedom from air pollution is not a small endeavor. We all need to do this. Street drugs are illegal. Why not street fumes?

Well, essentially, we do need more EV charging infrastructure across the state. I agree. With a few more charging stations, I could have easily driven to Cocoa Beach for last year’s EV Summit. Still, there is no or little inconvenience in the surrounding areas. And they did not seem aware of how easy it is to charge in Sarasota. Charging is not an inconvenience. It is a walk, a job, or a trip to the store while you charge. One can also easily charge at home as well.

What of the inconveniences of illness caused by air pollution from cars? I think I will choose to wait for a charge and not see the oncologist or neurologist — and brain specialists for cognitive issues from air pollution. I’m also happy I am replacing that air filter.

Back to the purpose of the visit: What is involved in this service check? Rotating the tires. Alignment. Replacing the cabin air filter. Checking the battery.

The LEAF is running fine. It is almost a year and a half with the LEAF … and no oil changes. They recommend a brake flush due to the mileage. This is all normal servicing of cars as far as I know, but a bit less to do thanks to no gas engine or various hoses and valves.

Yes, we need more infrastructure across the state. We are getting a bit more. Still, in the Tampa Bay area and south to Fort Myers, the infrastructure is quite good. (Wake up, Naples.)

I say to my service woman, “Thank you,” and, “If you drove a LEAF for a month, you would not want to go back to the Altima.”

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 Images by Cynthia Shahan for CleanTechnica.com and CleanTechnica.pics

Reprinted with permission.


 

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  • NOYGDBJA

    There just isn’t enough money in it for dealerships since the maintenance schedule and profit margin is less than a fraction of what is available for ICE machines, including Hydrogen fuel cell engines. Dealerships don’t like all electric cars. Just count the number of EV”s on thier lots. Most EV drivers know more about the car than the folks at the dealerships.